Lexicon Of Infinite Movement Charlotte Posenenske

Published by Kröller Müller Museum, Otterlo, 2019, 32 pages (b/w ill.), 21 × 29.7 cm, English

Price: €4

Produced on the occasion of Lexicon of Infinite Movement, at the Kröller Müller Museum, 18 May 2019 – 15 September 2019, the first Dutch museum solo exhibition of Charlotte Posenenske.

The works of Charlotte Posenenske (Wiesbaden, 1930-Frankfurt am Main, 1985) consist of series in an unlimited edition. According to a number of rules, they can be made and repeated – also by others – and combined with each other. With her radical and ‘democratic’ ideas about material, production and authorship, Charlotte Posenenske influenced and shaped conceptual and minimalist art of the sixties.

Curated by Suzanne Wallinga and Eloise Sweetman and featuring the work of Ruth Buchanan (New Plymouth, 1980) and Yeb Wiersma (Groningen, 1973) in reaction to the work of Charlotte Posenenske.

Also available here as a PDF.

#2019 #charlotteposenenske #eloisesweetman #ephemera #ruthbuchanan
Straying from the Line

Published by the Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin, 2019, unpaginated (colour & b/w ill.), 14.7 × 21 cm, German

Price: €12

Produced on the occasion of Straying from the Line at the Schinkel Pavillon from 13. April – 28. July 2019

Straying from the Line was dedicated to a fundamentally expanded perspective on the multiplicity of feminist tendencies in the art of the last 100 years. Instead of presenting a straight narrative of feminist art as a generation- and/or identity-specific style, the exhibition charted a network of multiple references, drawing connections between aesthetically and politically, geographically and historically heterogeneous perspectives.

Vito Acconci, Lynda Benglis, Dara Birnbaum, Jenna Bliss, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Teresa Burga, Tom Burr, Claude Cahun, Ellen Cantor, Tony Cokes, Anna Daučíková, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Nicole Eisenman, Ellen Gallagher, Jef Geys, Guerilla Girls, Barbara Hammer, Eva Hesse, Irma Hünerfauth, Mike Kuchar, Maria Lassnig, Leigh Ledare, Alice Lex-Nerlinger, Klara Lidén, Lee Lozano, Sarah Lucas, Ulrike Müller, Gabriele Münter, Anna Oppermann, Charlotte Posenenske, Tim Rollins & K.O.S., Aura Rosenberg, Betye Saar, Heji Shin, Marianna Simnett, Jack Smith, Nancy Spero, Diamond Stingily, Sturtevant, Martine Syms, Rosemarie Trockel, Anna Uddenberg, Raphaela Vogel, Constantina Zavitzanos & Park McArthur

#2019 #annadaučíková #barbarahammer #betyesaar #charlotteposenenske #claudecahun #diamondstingily #evahesse #irmahünerfauth #jacksmith #jefgeys #leelozano #lyndabenglis #parkmcarthur #rosemarietrockel #sturtevant #timrollinsandk.o.s. #tomburr #tonycokes
Mechanisms

Published by Roma Publications, Amsterdam and CCA Wattis Institute, San Fransisco, 2017, 288 pages (colour & bw ill.), 22 x 21 cm, English

Price: €34

Published on the occasion of Mechanisms, a group exhibition at CCA Wattis Institute (October 12, 2017 to February 24, 2018). It includes an essay by curator Anthony Huberman as well as contributions from artists Zarouhie Abdalian, Terry Atkinson, Lutz Bacher, Eva Barto, Neil Beloufa, Patricia L. Boyd, Jay DeFeo, Harun Farocki, Richard Hamilton, Aaron Flint Jamison, Jacob Kassay, Garry Neill Kennedy, Louise Lawler, Park McArthur, Jean-Luc Moulène, William Pope.L, Charlotte Posensenke, Cameron Rowland, and Danh Vo. Trisha Donnelly designed the cover.

Instead of documenting the exhibition, the catalogue reflects and expands on some of its core ideas. Designed by Scott Ponik and Julie Peeters, the book’s fabrication makes use of different printing techniques and “machines,” including an offset printer, a letterpress, and thermography, as well as a wide range of natural and synthetic paper stocks. Contributions by each of the exhibiting artists range from photo essays, theoretical essays, video transcripts and stills, interviews, and works designed especially for the page.

#2017 #anthonyhuberman #cameronrowland #ccawattisinstitute #charlotteposenenske #danhvo #harunfarocki #jacobkassay #jaydefeo #jeanlucmoulène #juliepeeters #louiselawler #lutzbacher #parkmcarthur #patricialboyd #scottponik #trishadonnelly #williampopel #zarouhieabdalian
Stuttgart 1989 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21 cm, German

Price: €15

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

#1989 #charlotteposenenske
Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21.7 cm, German

Price: €15

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

From a collection of catalogues documenting presentations of Posenenske’s work installed at various locations including Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Lufthansa, Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt and Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989, organised by Burkhard Brunn.

#1989 #charlotteposenenske
Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt 1988 Charlotte Posenenske

1988, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21.7 cm, German

Price: €15

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

From a collection of catalogues documenting presentations of Posenenske’s work installed at various locations including Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Lufthansa, Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt and Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989, organised by Burkhard Brunn.

#1988 #charlotteposenenske