Isa Genzken

Published by Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 1989, 24 pages (colour & b/w ill.), softcover, 24 × 30 cm, English

Price: €30 (Out of stock)

Produced on the occasion of Isa Genzken’s 1989 exhibition at Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam. With an essay by Peter Groot. Funded by Helge Achenbach Art Consulting, Düsseldorf and Daniel Buchholz, Köln.

#1989 #isagenzken
Stuttgart 1989 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21 cm, German

Price: €15

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

#1989 #charlotteposenenske
Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21.7 cm, German

Price: €15 (Out of stock)

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

From a collection of catalogues documenting presentations of Posenenske’s work installed at various locations including Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Lufthansa, Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt and Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989, organised by Burkhard Brunn.

#1989 #charlotteposenenske
Deutsche Bank 1989 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21.7 cm, German

Price: €15 (Out of stock)

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

From a collection of catalogues documenting presentations of Posenenske’s work installed at various locations including Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Lufthansa, Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt and Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989, organised by Burkhard Brunn.

#1 #1989 #charlotteposenenske
Deutsche Lufthansa 1967/1986 Charlotte Posenenske

1989, unpaginated (b/w ill.), 28 × 21.7 cm, German

Price: €15 (Out of stock)

As a representative of concrete-minimal art Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s. She aspired to a clear, hard realism of form, production, distribution and reception – all conditions that in the context of the 1968 movement meant changing society. In 1968, having come to the conclusion that art ultimately cannot have sufficient political impact Posenenske took the radical step of giving up art altogether.

She went on to study sociology and worked as a social scientist. Even though she could not envision political issues being pursued within a conceptual approach, it later became clear that she had formulated important aspects in her art that only came to bear in Concept Art in the 1970s. These aspects included the variability of objects, participation in production, the inclusion of a specific situation, a social context and institutional critique. (Between Bridges, 2007)

From a collection of catalogues documenting presentations of Posenenske’s work installed at various locations including Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Lufthansa, Grossmarkthalle Frankfurt and Hauptbahnhof Frankfurt 1989, organised by Burkhard Brunn.

#1989 #charlotteposenenske
Triptychos Post Historicus Braco Dimitrijević

Published by Le Consortium, Dijon, 1989, 32 pages (colour & b/w ill.), 20 × 26 cm, French / English

Price: €12 (Out of stock)

Dimitrijević gained an international reputation in the seventies with his Casual passer-by series, in which gigantic photo portraits of anonymous people were displayed on prominent facades and billboards in European and American cities. The artist also mimicked other ways of glorifying important persons by building monuments to passers-by and installing memorial plaques in honour of anonymous citizens.

In the mid-seventies he started incorporating in his installations original paintings borrowed from museum collections. The Triptychos Post Historicus, realized in numerous museums around the world, unite in a harmonious synthesis high art, everyday objects, and fruit. The artist’s statement “Louvre is my studio, street is my museum” expresses both the dialectical and transgressive nature of his oeuvre. In the last thirty years, Dimitrijevic has realized over 500 Triptychos Post Historicus, with paintings ranging from Leonardo’s Madonna to Malevich’s Red Square, in numerous museum collections including the Tate Gallery, London, the Louvre, the Musee National d’Art Moderne Paris, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York, the Musee d’Orsay, and the Russian State Museum, St Petersburg, amongst many others.

#1989 #bracodimitrijević