*1977 Kateřina Šedá

Published by JRP Ringier, Zurich, 2007, 160 pages (colour & b/w ill.), hardcover, 21.9 x 32.2 cm, Czech / English

Price: €34 (out of stock)

This book brings together the first complete survey of projects by the young Czech artist Katerina Sedá (*1977). The artist’s book is in the form of a box containing 10 folders which document each project (diagrams, graphs, drawings, texts, photographs, questionnaires) that Sedá carried out from 1999–2007.

Katerina Sedá bases her work on the observation of “invisible” contexts and social relationships between individuals in her most immediate surroundings—within her family and her birthplace, Ponetovice, a village in the Moravian countryside. The observations she makes (in the form of drawings, texts, and diagrams) then prompt a series of assignments, tasks, and games which she carries out in those surroundings. For example, her “society game” called “Nic tam není” [There’s Nothing There] (2003), involved the participation of all the inhabitants of Ponetovice. Based on observations she made, she created a universal “Regime for a Day”—an ordinary Saturday in a Moravian village. After cajoling her fellow villagers for some time, she was able, one Saturday, to get them to synchronise all their activities according to the regime she devised for the day, doing all the same things at the same times throughout the day. Katerina Sedá also collaborated on several projects with her grandmother. In “It Doesn’t Matter” (2005), her grandmother created several hundred drawings from memory, documenting the objects she had sold at the household goods shop where she’d worked her whole life. Sedá’s latest project was exhibited at Documenta XII.

Fourth volume of the series “Tranzit,” edited by Vít Havránek and focusing on Central and Eastern European artists.

#2007 #jrpringier #kateřinašedá
Shandyismus, Autorschaft als Genre Helmut Draxler

Published by Secession, Vienna and Merz Akadamie, Stuttgart, 2007, 332 pages (colour & b/w ill.), 21 × 30 cm, English

Price: €15

Published on the occasion of the exhibition Shandyismus, Autorschaft als Genre at Secession Vienna, February 22 – April 15, 2007. Curated by Helmut Draxler

Monika Baer, Georg Baselitz, Bernadette Corporation, Max Bill, Marcel Broodthaers, Marcel Duchamp, Jack Goldstein, Gareth James, Sergej Jensen, Chuck Jones, David Jourdan, Jutta Koether, Louise Lawler, Olia Lialina und Dragan Espenschied, Robert Frank, Martin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, Christian Philipp Müller, Michael Schuster, Josef Strau, Franz West sowie , Diedrich Diederichsen, Michael Dreyer, Clemens Krümmel, Franz Reitinger, Drehli Robnik, André Rottmann, Astrit Schmidt-Burkhardt, Tanja Widmann

The exhibition Shandyismus. Autorschaft als Genre refers to Laurence Sterne’s novel The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman from the 18th century. It will focus on Shandyism as a phenomenon or position, reflecting the diversity of points of contact with the media. A number of existing art works will be shown that express the methodological idiom of Shandyism. At the same time, artists have been invited to develop a “Shandyesque intervention” for the exhibition.

Texts: Diedrich Diederichsen, Helmut Draxler, Michael Dreyer, Clemens Krümmel, Shaun Regan, Franz Reitinger, Drehli Robnik, André Rottmann, Astrit Schmidt-Burkhardt, Peter de Voogd, Tanja Widmann

#2007 #andrérottmann #christianphilippmüller #diedrichdiederichsen #helmutdraxler #josefstrau #juttakoether #louiselawler #marcelbroodthaers #martinkippenberger #maxbill #michaeldreyer #michaelkrebber #monikabaer #secession
The Collections of Barbara Bloom Barbara Bloom

Published by Steidl/ICP, Göttingen, 2007, 272 pages (colour & b/w ill.), 30 × 25 cm, English

Price: €40

This volume assesses a wonderful body of work that encompasses installations, films, artist’s books and specimens from the artist’s vast archives of ephemera. Like Marcel Broodthaers and Susan Hiller, Bloom has a creative attraction toward taxonomy and museology: the installation “Greed” (1988), for instance, is comprised of a chair, an empty frame and a photograph of a museum gallery with a seated guard. An example of one of her own collections is a complete set of Vladimir Nabokov’s writings for which Bloom redesigned all of the book covers, referring both to herself and Nabokov as collectors (he obsessively collected editions of his own books) and in the process interposing herself as artist. In some cases, Bloom revisits previous installations to add new elements, resisting and upsetting the orderliness of a conventional artistic chronology. The Collections of Barbara Bloom includes essays by Dave Hickey and Susan Tallman and expands a project developed as part of Bloom’s Wexner Art Center Residency Award in 1998.

#2007 #barbarabloom #davehickey